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WELCOME
BELIEVERS

We’re siblings Jocelyn & Chris.  Thanks to our parents we grew up on a steady diet of records and radio. TV was never the focus in our household, instead, music was.


Today as we prepare to release our eighth studio record, we are reflecting on a question we’ve been asked by various well-meaning consultants and otherwise nosy music industry folks.


"Why on earth do you put so much effort into radio?"


The easy answer for us is because it works. Radio connects artists like us to actual communities and real people. It’s not monthly listeners or followers, it’s real people. Radio brings people to shows and introduces listeners to new music because radio is trusted.


Triple A radio in particular has remained our focus because ultimately we believe in it.  There is no format with more curators who make decisions by listening. It’s a format where good music sometimes stands a chance against artificially manufactured digital metrics.


We both believe in AAA radio period.


But instead of expounding continually on our own experience, we decided to reach out with some questions to some of the many folks in AAA who have inspired us.

And… if you’d like to be included and are willing to answer some questions from us, we’d love to hear from you!  Just email us at news@jocelynandchris.com

Our sincere love, gratitude, and thanks:)
Jocelyn & Chris

Radio is the OG of access for independent artists that STILL need REAL relationships to endure.

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DAVID 
BOURGEOIS

President Bridge Road Entertainment

Together with wife Anna, David operates White Lake Music, a five-studio recording facility in New York. The Bourgeois’s also operate Bridge Road Entertainment, an artist co-owned record label and label services company.

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Q:01

BIR: What are you working on today?

Q:03

BIR: In a world inundated with digital platforms, why has radio remained important in your artist growth strategy?

Q:02

BIR: What are the downsides in the industry today?

Q:04

BIR: Anything else?

JACKIE
INDRISANO

Career Talent Buyer

Jackie is a career talent buyer based in Boston. In addition to her experience booking legendary Beantown venues (including, among others, the Rat, Berklee’s Red Room, and Boston City Winery), she’s also spoken on advisory panels at music festivals across the country, including SXSW and the Move Music Festival.

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Q:01

Tell us a bit about your career. How did you get into the music industry? 

Q:03

In a world inundated with digital platforms, why is radio still important to venues?

Q:02

What has been your experience working with radio from the talent buyer/show promoter side of things? 

Q:04

(Short-form answer) What is your favorite thing about Boston area radio?

Triple A radio – is curated by people for people.

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JACK
BARTON

President of Jack Barton Entertainment

Jack has been a mainstay in AAA radio for decades. From is time AMDing WXPN in Philadelphia followed by a stint as MD at WYEP/Pittsburgh, to his tenure leading the AAA department at FMQB, he’s seen it all. These days, Jack runs his own company, JBE, which offers a host of music industry services with refined expertise and is currently setting up the AAA Summitfest, an industry conference to occur this

August in Boulder. 

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Q:01

You’ve worked in AAA radio in a lot of different roles—as programmer, as on-air talent, as FMQB team leader, as JBE founder, as Summitfest organizer, and even as artist manager. Tell us a little about what that variety of experiences has taught you. What keeps bringing you back to the format?

Q:03

In a world inundated with digital platforms, why is radio different?

Q:02

You’ve worked closely with lots of different AAA programmers in the past couple decades. Is there anything that makes AAA programmers different from other industry folks?

Q:04

What is your favorite thing about AAA radio?

RIK
AND ROXY

Rik and Roxy in the Morning, WWCT

TBA

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Q:01

Tell us a bit about your careers. How did you get started in radio?

Q:03

More specifically, what’s your favorite thing about being on-air in AAA?

Q:02

What brought you to Rik and Roxy in the Morning?

What’s your favorite thing about being on-air? 

Q:04

In a world inundated with digital platforms, what makes radio competitive?

DENNIS
CONSTANTINE

On-Air Personality KVNA-FM 100.1 / 92.1

Dennis has been a AAA powerhouse for as long as AAA radio has existed. That’s not an exaggeration—he played an instrumental part in the format’s beginnings during his time programming KBCO in the late 70s and 80s. Since leaving Boulder in ’93, he’s consulted with dozens of stations and PD’d at KINK and KFOG. Dennis currently plays an integral role in programming KVNA, WNCS, and WXRV.

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Q:01

Tell us a bit about your career. How has radio shaped your life?

Q:03

In a world inundated with digital platforms, why is radio important?

Q:02

You’ve been in AAA radio for a long time now. Is there something about the format that you particularly like? What makes it different from other formats?

Q:04

What is your favorite thing about AAA radio?

CHRIS
AND DAVE

Chris and Dave of WEXT

Chris and Dave of WEXT are the reason we write and play music. After seeing us perform way back in middle school, Dave told us that if we ever wrote original music, he’d play it on the radio. Turns out, that was all we needed to hear. We wrote our first song the next week and immediately caught the bug. WEXT was the first radio station to play our music and has been with us ever since!

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Q:01

We’ve talked about our history with you both in all kinds of interviews, but I’m not sure anyone has ever heard things from your side. With that in mind, could you share the story of how we met and got our first-ever radio spins?

Q:03

What is your favorite thing about AAA radio?

Q:02

In a world inundated with digital platforms, why is radio still important?